IMPACT OF Giving
2013 REPORT


Thank you for helping UTSA meet some incredible milestones in 2013.

In May, we announced that the university's first capital campaign reached its initial financial goal two and half years ahead of schedule. Your investment in UTSA is part of that success. The campaign continues with a new goal to raise $175 million.

The second important milestone was the UTSA endowment reaching $100 million for the first time. The size of a university's endowment is one of the criteria used to evaluate its status as a Tier One research university. We saw a 12.63 percent increase over the previous year, in part because of a challenge gift of $5 million from supermarket company H-E-B to encourage the creation of new endowed faculty positions. Ten donors stepped up to meet the challenge, adding to a growing pool of steady support.

UTSA's ascent as one of Texas' emerging research universities is directly tied to our ability to ensure that the best students and faculty are able and enticed to join our community. Gifts from friends like you are helping provide exceptional opportunities here—the kinds of opportunities that make UTSA top-tier. Gifts of all sizes helped the university award millions in scholarships this year. Research was funded, student-programs launched and new facilities were built. And, perhaps most notably, gifts brought a 1,000 pound roadrunner statue to campus and helped turn the Sombrilla Fountain back on.

This report demonstrates the vital impact that you and many other supporters have had at the university. We've done so much already— just imagine what more we will achieve. I am deeply thankful for your commitment to UTSA and hope you will renew your support each year.

Sincerely,

Marjie French, Vice President for External Relations



UTSA SCHOLARSHIPS MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Alexis Haight

McKinney Scholarship recipient, English major and a published, award winning author, senior Alexis Haight credits her UTSA teachers and the scholarship she has received for her growth as a young writer. She aspires to dedicate her talents to helping others get published. “The San Antonio culture is so wonderful and unique, and I’d really like to see the city grow in literature,” she said.

Nate Leonard

Despite being ranked third in his high school class of more than 500, coach after coach said that at 6 feet tall, Nate Leonard was simply too short to play center for a football team at the Division I level. His one shot came when he attended a UTSA camp before his senior year of high school. A week later, Coach Larry Coker offered him a full-scholarship. It was hard to believe after hearing over and over again that his lack of size was going to keep him from his dream. “Coach Coker saw the vision of what I could become, and I saw the vision of what UTSA was working to be. We took a chance on each other,” he said. Nate has gone on to start every game and provides inspiration on and off the field. When asked about the scholarship support, Nate shares, “I am so grateful for the support the team receives. Allowing us the opportunity to extend our vision and our life goals—the impact is immeasurable.”

UTSA RESEARCH CHANGES LIVES

Meizi He

Integrating faith and health, Dr. Meizi He, associate professor of health and kinesiology, is fighting childhood obesity and promoting healthy living through a faith- based intervention program called Building a Healthy Temple. She partners with churches in Latino communities to encourage healthy changes in diet and active lifestyles. With a recent gift of $250,000 from Baptist Health Foundation of San Antonio, Dr. He extended the program. “I cannot tell you how grateful I am to the foundation for providing the support to expand Building a Healthy Temple into the areas that need it most,” Dr. He said. “With the right tools, we can make a lasting difference in the lives of Latinos.”

John McCarrey

The Kleberg Distinguished Chair in Cellular and Molecular Biology and Director of the San Antonio Cellular Therapeutics Institute, Dr. McCarrey is working with a team to develop the baboon as a model system for studies of stem cell-based therapeutic approaches. Generous gifts from the Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation support this research to uncover new treatments for a variety of diseases.

By The Numbers
Fiscal Year 2013

By The Numbers
Capital Campaign